CROI Abstract Guidelines

Please note: The process for submitting Late Breaking abstracts is now closed.

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) invites abstracts for CROI 2014, to be held in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, from March 3 to March 6, 2014.

Abstracts should present new research or developing information on HIV/AIDS and related conditions. The Scientific Program Committee will select abstracts on the basis of their medical significance, timeliness, the quality of the data and methodology, and adherence to specific format requirements and other criteria described herein.

Abstract Timetable

Abstract submission opens September 19, 2013
Last day for submitting regular abstracts October 8, 2013
Submitters notified of regular abstract dispositions Week of December 3, 2013
Late-Breaker submission opens December 17, 2013
Deadline for Late-Breaker abstracts January 10, 2014

Abstract Submissions

Please note that after the Scientific Program Committee reviews the abstracts submitted for consideration, the disposition of each abstract will be sent via e-mail only to the submitting author identified on the submission form for that abstract. That contact will be responsible for sharing the disposition with all other authors of the abstract.

Abstract Length

The titles of abstracts should not exceed 85 characters (not including spaces). The body text should not exceed 2400 characters (not including spaces). Embedded images (tables, figures, etc) will be counted as 250 characters.

Required Elements

Each abstract must include the following:

  • Title. The title should appear in boldface at the top. It should be concise (no more than 85 characters, not including spaces) and unambiguously represent the subject of the abstract. Use standard American Medical Association (AMA) title case. Nouns, pronouns, verbs, and other important words begin with uppercase letters; coordinating conjunctions, articles, and prepositions of 3 letters or fewer should all be in lowercase letters unless they are the first or last words in a title or subtitle.
  • Authors’ names. These names should appear in below the title. They should be separated by commas, with first names first followed by middle initials and last name only (no titles or degrees). Bold the name of the presenting author. List no more than 10 authors on each abstract.
  • Background, Methodology, Results, and Conclusions. Those terms, along with the colon at the end of each, should appear in boldface type.

 

Background: This section briefly presents the hypothesis of the abstract or encapsulates the subject under study.
Methodology: This section details the experimental methods and processes employed in the study.
Results: This section describes the precise findings of the study. Promises of results “to be determined” are not acceptable.
Conclusions: This section describes logically sound conclusions and reliable inferences from the results.

Model of an Abstract Layout

Abstracts for CROI 2014: The Title Takes This Form and Summarizes the Content

Adams A, Arroyo S, Brown JP, Lee FL, Wythe G

BACKGROUND: Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio.

METHODOLOGY: Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura.

RESULTS: Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura.

CONCLUSIONS: Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura. Aliquam exhibeatur documentum, hoc est considerandum in conloquio. Libellum de mutantur scriptum elit, sed constare figura.

Listed below are the categories established for abstracts. Please be sure to identify the proper category when submitting an abstract. Be aware, however, that the Scientific Program Committee may, after reviewing abstracts, elect to assign yours to a different category that it deems more appropriate.

A.    Virology, including studies of both viral and host factors that involve replication studies in vitro and host restriction factors, viral life cycle, entry, tropism, and early and late viral phenotypes

B.     Molecular epidemiology and HIV/SIV evolution, including simian reservoirs, transmission clusters, dual infections, within patient diversity/compartmentalization, and subtype

C.    Pathogenesis - human studies: basic research studies that examine factors influencing disease outcome in humans, including HIV-host interactions, immune activation, host cell targets, cell compartments, genotype (viral and host) and disease, immune restoration, and mucosal factors

D.    Pathogenesis - animal models, including virus-host interactions, infection models, immune activation, host cell targets, cell compartments, genotype (viral and host) and disease, immune restoration, and mucosal factors

E.     Host immune responses to infection, vaccines, immunotherapy, including B and T cell responses to viral infection, vaccine studies, immune modulation studies (eg, cytokine interventions), opportunistic infections, end-organ disease and complications cytokine, vaccine and immune modulation studies

F.     HIV persistence, reservoirs, latency, eradication, including gene therapy

G.    Neuropathogenesis: all aspects of neuropathogenesis including neuroimmune-related studies

H.    Clinical pharmacology: all studies of drug pharmacology and pharmacodynamics

I.       Antiretroviral therapy: preclinical

J.      Antiretroviral therapy: randomized clinical trials

K.     Antiretroviral therapy: observational studies

L.     HIV drug resistance, including molecular mechanisms, pathogenesis, clinical implications, epidemiology, and resistance diagnostics

M.    HIV diagnostics including new technologies (any abstracts dealing with resistance, complications, TB, other opportunistic infections, hepatitis, or malignancies should be submitted to those categories)

N.    Hepatitis viruses, including diagnosis, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and therapy

O.    HIV-related and non-HIV related malignancies

P.     Cardiovascular complications of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy

Q.    Other complications of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy, including renal, hepatic, bone, lipid, and glucose disorders

R.    Tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections, including basic and clinical studies on bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and non-hepatitis viral infections

S.     HIV in women and women's health, including any studies specifically of women and treatment of pregnant women for their own health

T.     Maternal/fetal HIV, including any studies specifically of mothers and their babies and transmission

U.    Pediatrics and adolescents, including any/all studies specifically of children

V.     Prevention intervention studies, including preclinical and clinical studies of microbicides, pre-exposure and post-exposure prophylaxis, treatment as prevention, medical male circumcision, and other biomedical or behavioral interventions

W.   Epidemiology, including serologic testing to assess incidence, excluding drug resistance

X.     Health care delivery and health systems in low and middle income settings, including cost-effectiveness, modeling studies, and other implementation science

 

Abstracts Describing Clinical Trials

All abstracts reporting data from clinical trials of human subjects should describe the study design, such as prospective, randomized, double-blind, etc; the study population, including numbers enrolled, demographic information, and methods; whether the results are final or preliminary and whether the study is ongoing or completed; the statistical analyses employed, including those used to support the results; and conclusions.

The presenting author should have been involved in the gathering of the raw data and be able to discuss the analysis.

Abstracts That Describe a New Compound

Abstracts should be sufficient to allow for meaningful review of the compound's data. This can include isolation, activity, chemical structure, mechanism of action, toxic effects, and pharmacologic data. The chemical or molecular structure must be shown.

Common Reasons for Abstract Rejection

  1. Information is not new enough
  2. Methodology is inadequate or insufficient to support conclusions
  3. Background does not summarize the hypothesis; submission is poorly written
  4. Abstract is duplicative of other submissions
  5. Inappropriate for CROI
  6. Controls are absent or inadequate
  7. Statistical evaluation is inadequate or absent
  8. Summary of essential results is inadequate or absent
  9. Data are inadequate or insufficient to support conclusions
  10. Submission reports clinical trial and data from unplanned analysis or incomplete or ongoing studies
  11. Format does not follow guidelines (eg, section(s) missing, more than 1 graphic, table, or figure submitted)